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By sandbagger2
#485943
Press Release: Middletown Residents Inform Township of Pipeline Zoning Complaint
April 3, 2017

April 3, 2017--Six residents of Middletown Township, Delaware County, have now notified Middletown Township that they believe it has a duty to enforce the Township Code’s provisions relating to minimum setback distances required from residential housing units to petroleum product pipelines. The six residents claim that, while the Township previously saw fit to grant easements to Sunoco Pipeline L.P. for its Mariner East 2 hazardous liquids pipeline project, Middletown has not waived its right to enforce the minimum setback provisions of § 210-37.


As alleged in their Complaint, § 210-37 of the Middletown Township Code requires that there be a minimum distance of 75 feet between a dwelling unit and a petroleum or petroleum products transmission line. The Code specifically states, “In no case shall there be a distance of less than 75 feet between a dwelling unit and a petroleum or petroleum products transmission line.”

The Code also provides that “[n]o petroleum, petroleum products or natural gas transmission line shall be constructed in a subdivision or land development on less than a fifty-foot easement. Such lines shall be installed in the center of the easement and shall comply with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations.”

Each of the plaintiffs is either a tenant or property owner in Middletown. One of the property owners lives 30 feet from her next door neighbor’s home. Sunoco’s easement goes right through that space. With its recently announced plans to increase Mariner capacity to 770,000 barrels a day, if permitted the company will lay two pipes in that space, each one of which will be less than 15 feet from the owner’s home.

Four of the plaintiffs live in Township apartment complexes. The Mariner pipelines are planned to be laid in a space between buildings within those complexes where the plaintiffs’ units are substantially less than 75 feet from the hazardous liquid pipes.

MCCS recently commissioned a report from Quest Consultants, a respected Oklahoma firm, to use advanced leak detection simulation software to predict worst case effects from a leak of the Mariner pipeline only 650 feet from the Glenwood Elementary School. The study confirms the extreme danger posed by a rupture and found that it could result in a combustible, heavier-than-air vapor cloud that could migrate up to 1800 feet in 3 minutes. Ignition would result in a jet fire that would leave little to no opportunity of escape. Government data shows that Sunoco has the worst leak rate in the pipeline industry. The six plaintiffs all reside in dwelling units that are well under 75 feet from the proposed Mariner pipelines.

If Middletown Township chooses not to act to enforce the Code within 30 days, the plaintiffs intend to file suit in the Common Pleas Court of Delaware, seeking to enforce the distance requirements of the Code in the siting of the Mariner East 2 pipelines. The Township has received the notice and a copy of the complaint that will be filed against Sunoco Logistics, but has not yet responded.
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By eriknben10
#485945
One wonders how deep the line is going thru there. I know some places it is well over 100' deep.
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By sandbagger2
#486160
FRIDAY, APRIL 7, 2017
Delaware County Residents Give Notice Of Lawsuit To Enforce Local Pipeline Ordinance


Six residents of Middletown Township, Delaware County, Tuesday announced they have notified Middletown Township that they believe it has a duty to enforce the Township Code’s provisions relating to minimum setback distances required from residential housing units to petroleum product pipelines.

The six residents claim that, while the Township previously saw fit to grant easements to Sunoco Pipeline L.P. for its Mariner East 2 hazardous liquids pipeline project, Middletown has not waived its right to enforce the minimum setback provisions of Section 210-37.

As alleged in their Complaint, Section 210-37 of the Middletown Township Code requires that there be a minimum distance of 75 feet between a dwelling unit and a petroleum or petroleum products transmission line.
The Code specifically states, “In no case shall there be a distance of less than 75 feet between a dwelling unit and a petroleum or petroleum products transmission line.”

The Code also provides that “[n]o petroleum, petroleum products or natural gas transmission line shall be constructed in a subdivision or land development on less than a fifty-foot easement. Such lines shall be installed in the center of the easement and shall comply with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations.”

Each of the plaintiffs is either a tenant or property owner in Middletown. One of the property owners lives 30 feet from her next door neighbor’s home. Sunoco’s easement goes right through that space.
With its recently announced plans to increase Mariner capacity to 770,000 barrels a day, if permitted the company will lay two pipes in that space, each one of which will be less than 15 feet from the owner’s home.
Four of the plaintiffs live in Township apartment complexes. The Mariner pipelines are planned to be laid in a space between buildings within those complexes where the plaintiffs’ units are substantially less than 75 feet from the hazardous liquid pipes.

Middletown Coalition for Community Safety recently commissioned a report from Quest Consultants, a respected Oklahoma firm, to use advanced leak detection simulation software to predict worst case effects from a leak of the Mariner pipeline only 650 feet from the Glenwood Elementary School.
The study confirms the extreme danger posed by a rupture and found that it could result in a combustible, heavier-than-air vapor cloud that could migrate up to 1800 feet in 3 minutes. Ignition would result in a jet fire that would leave little to no opportunity of escape.

Government data shows that Sunoco has the worst leak rate in the pipeline industry. The six plaintiffs all reside in dwelling units that are well under 75 feet from the proposed Mariner pipelines.
If Middletown Township chooses not to act to enforce the Code within 30 days, the plaintiffs intend to file suit in the Common Pleas Court of Delaware, seeking to enforce the distance requirements of the Code in the siting of the Mariner East 2 pipelines.

The Township has received the notice and a copy of the complaint that will be filed against Sunoco Logistics, but has not yet responded.

Attached is a portion of Aston Township's code.
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By sandbagger2
#486478
SAFETY MEETING - SUNOCO PIPELINE
MAY 22, 2017, 7:00 PM
ASTON COMMUNITY CENTER


Residents of 5th & 6th Ward to receive a letter with an agenda of items to be covered.

OPEN TO PUBLIC
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By sandbagger2
#486483
RTM residents skeptical of Sunoco’s pipeline safety plans
By Leslie Krowchenko, Times Correspondent
POSTED: 04/20/17, 8:29 PM EDT | UPDATED: 5 HRS AGO 3 COMMENTS


MIDDLETOWN >> Ten members of Middletown Coalition for Community Safety waited patiently through nearly three hours of Rose Tree Media School Board committee reports to address the main issue on their minds.

The district held a safety summit March 31 related to concerns regarding the proposed Sunoco Logistics Mariner East 2 pipeline, a portion of which with valve station is slated for installation under a road 650 feet from the playground of Glenwood Elementary School. The purpose of the closed-door summit was to analyze the situation and formulate an emergency plan should circumstances require immediate action by the staff and approximately 450 students.

To prepare for the summit, the district contacted local townships, state police, fire and medical first responders, the Delaware County Emergency Management Department, state Department of Environmental Protection, petroleum safety engineers and Sunoco Logistics experts. Representatives were joined by school board members for the four-hour session to share their expertise and contribute to developing emergency response plans.

“We had two questions – how can we be ultra-safe and what is the plan if there is an incident?” said Schools Superintendent Jim Wigo. “We found our questions led to other questions and possibly additional meetings to discuss other issues.”

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Following the summit, Sunoco provided the district with a two-page recap of project information, which noted “school districts throughout the Greater Delaware Valley region co-exist on or are adjacent to pipelines and/or valve sites.” It also outlined items regarding safety and engineering and ongoing operations and maintenance.

The review, made available to residents, jumpstarted their comments. Coalition members hired an outside firm to complete an independent hazards study focusing on the potential consequences and probability of a pipeline breach near the school and disagreed with some of Sunoco’s findings.

“We look at this and see Sunoco’s spin,” said Seth Kovnat. “They cannot defend what they are doing.”

While the district approved a resolution of concern last year regarding the pipeline and sponsored the summit, coalition members were reminded the proposed line is not on district property. Operations Committee Chairman Harry Postles suggested the specifics are “a PUC debate, not a school district debate,” and Wigo noted project approval is solely in the hands of municipal governments and regulatory agencies.

“We recognize that families are calling on the district to help slow or stop this project, but we have little or no say,” he added. “It will proceed with or without Rose Tree Media’s support and/or opposition.”

Parents have also requested information about the evacuation plan, but divulging the details would compromise student safety, noted Wigo. As superintendent, he must balance their security with the public’s right to know.

Father and coalition member Tom Smith, however, said families like his entrust the district with their youngsters every day.

“Sunoco Logistics has no contractual obligation to me,” he added. “I put the safety of my daughter in your hands and you are responsible for our children.”

Coalition members posed scenarios which the directors had not considered, such as the need for specific pediatric equipment. The board made note of their suggestions for future discussions.

“We have no authority because it is not on our property, but we want to be informed and prepared,” said Tracy Barusevicius. “We all have a role to play.”
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By sandbagger2
#486506
Fearful parents demand schools near gas pipeline release evacuation plans
Updated: JANUARY 11, 2017 — 5:07 PM EST
by Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer @Kathy_Boccella | kboccella@phillynews.com


Behind closed doors at Rose Tree Media school headquarters in Delaware County, the “safety summit” brought together district and township leaders, first responders, officials from Sunoco Logistics, and even Homeland Security to draw up school evacuation plans in the event of a catastrophic explosion or leak from the impending Mariner East 2 pipeline.
Not in the room -- barred from attending, in fact -- were the people whose growing anxiety and anger prompted the summit: a coalition of more than 2,700 elementary school parents and allies who fear their children won't be able to get out of harm's way should disaster strike the pipeline as it carries 275,000 barrels of natural gas liquids daily through their densely populated suburbs.

A tight lid was kept on the late March confab. In a statement, Rose Tree Media Superintendent James Wigo joined other attendees in insisting that releasing evacuation details would “compromise student safety,” for instance in a school shooting. “Think about the horrors of a potential sniper situation.”

The secrecy has further inflamed the Middletown Coalition for Community Safety, which continues to add members in Delaware and Chester Counties, through which Mariner 2 will soon pass. It formed last August after parents learned the pipeline would come within 650 feet of Rose Tree Media’s Glenwood Elementary, attended by 430 children. The group tried to stop Middletown Township from granting easements near the school, but lost. Since then, it has pressed Rose Tree Media and the West Chester Area School District for answers about student safety, while sounding the alarm at other schools along the route.

According to risk assessments commissioned by the coalition, a vapor cloud leak can spread 1,800 feet in three mintues, and ignition of the gas can produce a fireball with a blast radius up to 1,100 feet that would burn until the pipeline is fully purged.

As many as 40 Pennsylvania schools would be in the potential "blast zone" if the line were to explode near them. Thousands of houses and facilities such as nursing homes also adjoin the route, but coalition founder Eve Miari said that worries about the schools have trumped other issues. “An elementary school is sort of like the heart center of the community," she said. "It’s where we send our babies."

The 350-mile, $2.5 billion Mariner East 2 line is under construction in Western Pennsylvania and working its way east after approvals from state regulators earlier this year. The first of two pipelines, it is slated for completion by September, and will move natural gas liquids such as propane, ethane, and butane from fracking regions as far west as Ohio to Sunoco’s refinery on the Delaware River in Marcus Hook.

In the view of the pipeline's builders and supporters, the coalition is tilting at windmills.
Sunoco Logistics has exceeded all modern safety standards in designing the Mariner East 2, said communications manager Jeff Shields. He noted that nine older natural gas pipelines crisscross the Philadelphia suburbs, including some that pass through school properties, without controversy. The idea that pipelines cannot operate safely near schools, he said, is similar to the argument advanced by environmentalists trying to get shale gas drilling banned in the vicinity of schools.
"Their claims and rhetoric," he said of the anti-natural gas movement, "are not supported by fact or history."

The federal Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration states on its website that pipelines are "by far the safest method for transporting energy products." However, when accidents occur, they "present significant risks to the public and the environment."

In the last 20 years, there have been 11,462 pipeline incidents nationally with 324 deaths, 1,331 injuries, and $7 billion in damages, according to the agency, which also has general evacuation recommendations. Its Emergency Response Guideline calls for school officials to test the wind direction and move children on foot at least a half-mile upwind of the pipeline. Cars and cellphones cannot be used, for they could ignite leaked gas.

That sounds unworkable to Eric Friedman, a coalition member who lives near the pipeline route in Chester County.
“I have not been able to come up with a real safety plan,” said Friedman, who has trained pilots and studied risk mitigation. “How would you have a real evacuation of hundreds of elementary kids on foot?"

“The safety plan is not credible,” said Nancy Harkins, of Westtown, also a coalition member. “Run a half-mile upwind and don’t use your cellphone? You can’t even use a door knocker because that could ignite it.”

Coalition activists contend that Sunoco Logistics has a poor record for accidents along its roughly 8,000 miles of pipeline transporting various fossil fuels. They recount incidents as recent as the October 2016 spill of 55,000 gallons of gasoline from a Sunoco pipeline into the Susquehanna River.

Pipeline critics also say the volatile mix of fuels that will flow through Mariner East 2 poses a greater risk than existing pipelines in the region. They point to a January 2015 blast in Follansbee, W.Va., involving a relatively new pipeline the same size as Mariner and carrying similar fuels; it burned five acres of woodland and damaged a home 2,000 feet away.
Sunoco's Shields cited an independent study by the consulting firm Accufacts Inc., which advises government agencies and industry on pipeline safety. It found that the Mariner project "meets or exceeds the prudent technical approaches commensurate with the safe transportation of natural gas liquids."

School officials have been caught in the crossfire between pipeline proponents and parents.
“It’s an emotional thing,” said West Chester Area Superintendent James Scanlon, who attended the March summit. “The key is safety. It doesn’t look like the thing is going to get stopped.”

Less than 200 feet away from the pipeline path in West Chester are two Catholic elementary schools, SS. Peter and Paul and SS. Simon and Jude. A survey by Fractracker Alliance, a nonprofit that does energy-related mapping and data analysis, also counted a half-dozen public or charter schools in Aston, Elverson, Exton, and West Chester within 1,000 feet.
A spokesman for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia declined to comment.


In challenging the safety claims of an oil giant such as Sunoco, as well as local officials, coalition members have looked to their everyday know-how. Their numbers include a Navy veteran with a background in emergency preparedness, a pediatric flight nurse, and a structural aerospace engineer.

“I have a lot of experience with high-pressure tubing with aerospace,” said Seth Kovnat, the engineer, who had been planning to send his two young children to Glenwood but is now thinking about moving. “There’s 400 houses (in Middletown) within that blast zone that have zero input into whether or not it’s allowed to happen or not – it’s a travesty.”
For now, parents say they’re baffled and disappointed by the lengths to which school officials have gone to exclude them from the disaster-planning process.

Scanlon said he believes the possibility of a pipeline accident near a school is “pretty minimal” but acknowledged "there were still some questions" about the communication chain during an incident.

“The response plan we are developing is fluid, because we know that situations can change in a heartbeat,” Wigo, of Rose Tree Media, said in a statement. "We have little or no say in this project and it will proceed with or without Rose Tree Media’s support and/or opposition.”

Such words stoke the fears of parents like Allison Chabot, the mother of first and fifth graders at Glenwood Elementary. “We don’t know how seriously people are taking these risks," she said, "and what their plan is for mitigation and protection.”

But, she added, she might not have to worry about it much longer. “We’re trying to figure out how we can move" away from Middletown, she said. "We’re not the only ones. But the problem is that property values are going to plummet.”
Read more by Kathy Boccella
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By sandbagger2
#486677
So what is the official total of monies received for the township and what was it allotted for? Though they've elaborated on the information presented, it's vague.

Official Aston Township Website > Government > Boards, Committees & Commissions > Sunoco Pipeline – Mariner East 2 Project > MONEY OBTAINED FROM EASEMENT & RIGHT OF WAY AGREEMENTS
MONEY OBTAINED FROM EASEMENT & RIGHT OF WAY AGREEMENTS

Besides Middletown Township that announced the amount of money ($1.8 Million) that was given to them by Sunoco at their Board of Commissioners meeting, there has not been information released from the neighboring communities the pipeline will be running through.
According to the agreement written up by Sunoco, the amount of money that was given to each Municipality was decided by the amount of land. needed for Easements and Right of Ways and the market value of those properties.
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